ASUU Meets With Senate, Insists Against IPPIS

ASUU STRIKE

The Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) has restated the unwillingness of its members to embrace the Integrated Payroll and Personnel Information System (IPPIS) initiated by the Federal Government.

Following a recent intervention of the upper chamber house on the federal government’s (IPPIS)-ASUU issue, which aimed at reaching a resolve hopeful for the reopening of Nigerian universities, the ASUU leader, Prof Biodun Ogunyemi, spelt the indisposition of the Union towards a reversal of its decision. On the course of deliberating with the senate, the Union also disclosed its already established payment system for university lecturers known as the University Transparency and Accountability Solution (UTAS).

According to Ogunyemi, who described the IPPIS as foreign, argued that the Union members are not part of the IPPIS as there is no established familiarity with the system unlike the (UTAS) which was been tactfully initiated as well developed in the country home.

In his words, “We told the Senate leadership during our meeting today, about UTAS, which is home-grown while IPPIS is foreign; we are talking about local content. We have shown that we are inventors; we are creators of software and we are also capable of doing what our colleagues are doing in other parts of the world; so, Nigerian scholars are not inferior; why should we be patronising foreigners for what we can do in Nigeria?” he questioned.

However, ASUU’s meeting with the Senate was successful but the chances of calling of its strike action remains very slim.
Speaking earlier, Ogunyemi referred back to the inconsistencies of Federal government to meeting with the demands of the Union on the issue adding that the federal governments’ threat of “No IPPIS, No salary” after a very long period of undue response, was imposing and not welcome.

Responding, the Senate President Lawan, pointed out that the meeting was subsequent to the one held in October 2019 to sort out, as well as reconcile the differences existing between Federal Government and the union.

“We really don’t need this kind of situation where our Universities are shut. Our children are the victims of this. He said.

“Therefore, the government and ASUU ought to find a common ground for our institutions, particularly our Universities to open and of course, offer the kind of services that are expected of our Universities.

“We cannot afford, as a country, to continue to have this kind of crisis. So I receive you on behalf of my colleagues at the Senate and indeed the National Assembly. The idea is to find out how we can resolve this issue.”

“Government cannot expect to have it all its way and I believe that ASUU shouldn’t expect it to be that everything it asked for must be given,” Lawan said.

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